Sex Education for the Real World…

 


Microbeads; Know Your Materials…

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Posted August 26, 2014 by Kimani in Le Vadge Shop

Microbeads; Know Your Materials…

*Update: As of December 2015, microbeads have been banned in the United States **

 

Most people have a regimen when it comes to getting ready to start the day. For me, I like to head to the gym, come home and shower, exfoliate with a good scrub, and prepare for the hours to come. I’ve never really been into fancy facial care products, but I do love exfoliation. One way that many people choose to do this is by using face products containing microbeads. They leave your skin feeling soft and pores looking cute – but what exactly are they? Today, we’ll take a look at the composition of microbeads and what you’re really doing with them.

Microbeads

Microbeads are tiny bits of plastic, typically shaped like microscopic pearls and found in popular cosmetic items like facial scrub and toothpaste. They are effective in scrubbing off dead skin and shrinking pores, but also have a dangerous side that do not get much coverage. Microbeads have even been found inside live fish being prepared for consumption. I used to think that they burst while you were washing your face and dissolved into the water, then I discovered that microbeads are not water soluble. This truly made me nervous, so I decided to do a little research.

 

 

Can you imagine eating those little plastic beads?

Microbeads in water and fish

via takepart.com

The thought is scary, but is very much a real threat, despite food regulations that call for inspection of fish before hitting retailers. Think about Uncle Joe as he fishes in the lake and brings some home to cook for dinner. You could be enjoying plastic crusted grouper. Yeah, that’s real.

So, what’s the alternative to microbeads? 

 

 

 

 

Try an all natural exfoliator like a salt/sugar scrub or a body wash/bar containing exfoliating oatmeal. There are plenty of other ways to exfoliate your skin, while avoiding the potentially dangerous effects of microbeads.

 

Sound Off: Do you use microbeads? Think you’ll reconsider them with the new ban in place?

 

Resources:

CBS News

Huffington Post

Time.com

CNN.com  




About the Author

Kimani

A NY transplant in Florida, Kimani has taken on the task of educating the world on sexual health and education. The Mount Vernon native has seen AIDS and HIV spread through her community like wildfire, and hopes to cease the transmission of these and other diseases one person at a time. If you know better, you're inclined to do better.

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